ministry – kidsprayer.com http://www.kidsprayer.com World Network of Prayer Sun, 28 Oct 2018 02:59:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.14 What Are YOU Doing? http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/ideas/what-are-you-doing-2/ Mon, 21 May 2012 16:41:45 +0000 http://www.kidsprayer.com/?p=4383 Children matter; no one questions that. What many do question is a child’s ability to minister at a young age. We often take on the mindset that they aren’t old enough, skilled enough, or knowledgeable enough yet to do such things when in fact, God has equipped them through His Spirit. They may mess up, […] ]]>

Children matter; no one questions that. What many do question is a child’s ability to minister at a young age. We often take on the mindset that they aren’t old enough, skilled enough, or knowledgeable enough yet to do such things when in fact, God has equipped them through His Spirit. They may mess up, make mistakes, or even fail at times, but that’s how they get experience… same as you and me. Give them a chance. If we train them
now, look at how much further down the road they will be as an adult!

Use the following handouts to discuss the talents and abilities of your children, and how to use a blessing jar to get them in the habit of looking for ways to bless others.

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Ownership http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/articles/ownership/ Thu, 26 Apr 2012 15:42:18 +0000 http://www.kidsprayer.com/?p=4345 “What are you going to do when you get older?” This is perhaps one of the most frequent questions asked to a child by teachers, mentors and adults. It’s a good question. It’s a great question. Yet, it’s a terrible question! What do I mean by that? Shouldn’t we be interested in what children want […] ]]>

“What are you going to do when you get older?” This is perhaps one of the most frequent questions asked to a child by teachers, mentors and adults. It’s a good question. It’s a great question. Yet, it’s a terrible question!

What do I mean by that? Shouldn’t we be interested in what children want to as they grow into adulthood? Yes. Shouldn’t we start planning for our children’s future? Yes. Shouldn’t we encourage the children to aim for their goals as they mature? Yes! Yes! Yes! Shouldn’t we wait for them to do this when they are grown. NO!

A great dilemma of childhood is being looked on as if you have nothing to contribute until you have grown into adulthood. A child’s area of “purpose” is most often confined to adolescent activities, school programs and being helpers in Sunday school. There’s nothing wrong with these areas of focus but they can be limiting regarding personal growth. 

John Maxwell teaches a concept called, “The Law of Lid” (you can find his resources online or in many bookstores.) He teaches how a person (and this doesn’t exclude children) will often only rise to the level of expectation and limitation that they are given. Churches often teach this in a leadership series but the concept also applies to children. If we don’t push them to excel, most won’t.

How does this relate to prayer? Most involved in Kids Prayer ministries do push their children to pray. If not, they should. The question we need to ask ourselves is how far and into what areas? Are we satisfied that a child can recite the Lord’s Prayer only? Are we happy if they can pray over a snack, a meal or a Sunday school lesson? Are we content if they can pray for their family before bed? 

In all of the above examples we should be happy, but not content. As trainers we have the responsibility to push those under us to their maximum, spiritual potential. We should push them to pray beyond their own needs or even the needs of their immediate family. We need to train them to pray for their church, their community, their government and their world. As we push them their level of understanding of God’s Kingdom grows and they develop a greater sense of purpose than just a snack-time chant. We should also push them to intercede and travail for the lost and seek God to lead them into what He wants them to pray for. 

 

Here is an example regarding your local church:

Instead of just praying for the church in a general, non-specific way, share with the children the vision of the church and its current needs. Talk about each ministry of the church, what it does, and how they can pray for that ministry and those involved in it. Bring in the ministry leaders, or even the pastor, and have them share their burden with the children. As they listen, they will gain a greater understanding of the purpose of the church and how it affects their world. It will give them a better understanding of what they can pray for.

Don’t stop there; push them some more. Ask the leaders if there are any ways that the children can help in any area of that ministry. Perhaps they can help with paper work, putting things together, setting up for meetings, etc. Train them to pray for that ministry as they work.

Using this method of training will create ownership and the more a person feels ownership in something the more likely they will not walk away from it, especially when they see results. The younger children may do less than the older children but the point is… they are doing SOMETHING, and they are doing it NOW. Raise the lid and help them grow spiritually and in their prayer life. 

In the beginning I mentioned how that famous question can be great, and yet terrible all at the same time. If our goal for a child’s ministry or a deep prayer life is always in the future then we loose the greatest timespan in their life to train them for it. Statistics prove that a large number of youth leave church by the time they become adults, taking their ministries with them. Don’t wait until they are grown. God gives ministry to children just as He does adults; they just need some guidance and a little push. Add active prayer training with that and you’ll have a child that will forever be changed.You may even be amazed at the leaders you are developing.

This week, ask yourself what you are doing to empower your children in personal ministry and prayer. 

-Colleen Clabaugh

Below are some resources you can use with your children to pray for churches, missionaries, and people groups. 

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A Successful Kids Prayer Ministry http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/articles/a-successful-kids-prayer-ministry/ Tue, 27 Mar 2012 16:34:00 +0000 http://www.kidsprayer.com/?p=4312 Recently we asked our Facebook Kids Prayer Focus Group to tell us in their own words what they envisioned as a successful Kids Prayer ministry. The Bible says that “where there is no vision the  people  perish.” For a ministry to be truly effective you need to know what your goal is so you can […] ]]>

Recently we asked our Facebook Kids Prayer Focus Group to tell us in their own words what they envisioned as a successful Kids Prayer ministry. The Bible says that “where there is no vision the  people  perish.” For a ministry to be truly effective you need to know what your goal is so you can consistently evaluate whether the things you are doing are helping reach that goal.

Here are some responses:

Question: 

“We’d like to have as many of you as possible define for us in your own terms what you see as the end result of a successful kids prayer ministry. What is your goal in specific terms?”

Answers:

Allison Harrison Mack:
I love this question because it’s something I think about often! It’s what keeps me motivated. My goal is first and foremost to see all my kids filled with the Holy Ghost and loving God above all else and that they make Heaven! Second my prayer is that through loving God and what they are learning they will become great warriors in the kingdom. They may not all be preachers or whatever else BUT I pray that they will all know how to listen to God and follow His calling whatever that may be. Third I pray that they pass it on! When the time comes I want them to be able to pass the mantle and know that generations are following Christ because of their faithfulness! 

Annette Jordan:
Success at the close of a child’s tenure in kids prayer is that the end is just the beginning. If we can graduate a child to the next ministry grounded in the foundational principles of a daily relationship with God, and with the attitude towards worship and prayer being “that’s just what we do” we have set up our children to succeed at becoming powerful forces as adults. My goal is to develop entire generations through kids prayer to define the future of the church.

Chris Anderson:
My definition of success can only be witnessed over large spans of time. When I see kids not living for God ten years later, that seemed to be in rapt attention while I was teaching them, I feel my teaching was not successful. But recently I have seen the fruit of some of my labors, which are grown ups living and Apostolic life for God, and I am very thankful that He called me into children’s ministry. I learned you can’t base your success on an emotion. Be faithful to your message and your ministry, pour your 100% in, and that is success.

John Alan Wilson II:
 The overall goal is to help the children to understand the power of having a relationship with God, that can only come through prayer. As far as making it a specific, measurable goal, that is much more difficult to define! I would say that a successful kids prayer ministry would be one that the parents notice at home. If the children start pushing the parents and I start getting feedback that their children are encouraging them and challenging them to evaluate their own prayer lives, that is a success. Also, the results should be seen through the fruit that comes from the children, as far as watching them flourish in ministry and as witnesses as they age.

Michelle Cron:
To me a successful prayer ministry for kids is to see them continue in prayer when they become teenagers. I taught teens for many years, and I have seen too many of them walk away from God once they turned 18 or got to college. While parents livestyles had a lot to do with it for some, I have noticed those who had a real desire for God as a child and had learned to really pray had better success living for God as a teenager. I want to give my kids all the tools they need to survive those years.

 

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Kids Praying at UPCI General Conference http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/kids-praying-at-upci-general-conference/ Sun, 16 Oct 2011 16:47:30 +0000 http://www.kidsprayer.com/?p=3803 World Network of Prayer, along with its Kids Prayer ministry, was honored to open the 2011 UPCI General Conference in Louisville, KY with prayer. Flo Shaw, WNOP International Coordinator, opened with prayer for the city of Louisville. Thetus Tenney prayed for the conference, speakers and leaders. Then three children – Jewell Leonard, Emma Nickel, and […] ]]>

World Network of Prayer, along with its Kids Prayer ministry, was honored to open the 2011 UPCI General Conference in Louisville, KY with prayer. Flo Shaw, WNOP International Coordinator, opened with prayer for the city of Louisville. Thetus Tenney prayed for the conference, speakers and leaders. Then three children – Jewell Leonard, Emma Nickel, and Adrian Hood – prayed for Home Missions, Foreign Missions, families, and the orphans of the world. Colleen Clabaugh prayed for youth, children, and the institution of kids prayer in our churches and homes. Thomas Suey ended with prayer for American and our nations of the world.

This was a first time event for WNOP and one that we felt honored to do. Thank you United Pentecostal Church International for giving our children the opportunity to minister and change their world. The conference could not have been opened in any better way than prayer. View the video clips below:

 

 

 

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Sweet and Sour Grab Bags http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/ideas/sweet-and-sour-grab-bags/ Wed, 21 Sep 2011 14:17:18 +0000 http://www.kidsprayer.com/?p=3685 Prepare one grab bag with several different kinds of candy—sweet, sour, hot, and dark chocolate—for every four kids. Form groups of four and give each group a grab bag. Have children take turns reaching into the bag for one candy. When each child has a treat, explain that the candies represent different kinds of prayer.  […] ]]>

Prepare one grab bag with several different kinds of candy—sweet, sour, hot, and dark chocolate—for every four kids. Form groups of four and give each group a grab bag. Have children take turns reaching into the bag for one candy. When each child has a treat, explain that the candies represent different kinds of prayer.  Use the following examples to lead kids in prayer.

 Sweet candy—thank God for his many blessings

 Sour candy—ask God to bless those who are bitter from hurts in their life

 Hot candy—ask God to keep you excited about serving him.

 Dark-chocolate candy—pray for someone who’s going through a difficult time.

 After you’ve prayed, enjoy the treats. Have each child put one of each candy in a sandwich bag to take home. Encourage children to teach their families what they’ve learned about prayer.

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Broken Tools http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/articles/broken-tools/ Thu, 07 Jul 2011 15:29:41 +0000 http://new.kidsprayer.com/?p=3532 ]]> During a recent devotion we talked about tools, and how God uses us to fulfill different purposes in His kingdom. A few months prior I had bought a house out in the country with a big yard that had not been properly taken care of by the previous owner. The bushes, weeds, and trees had grown up and had not been pruned causing me to spend much of my free time hacking, clipping, cutting and sawing away at the foliage, and then disposing of it all. My body was continually decorated with cuts, scrapes and bruises from trying to clean up the mess, and I believe I took more aspirin in thosemonths of work than I had taken most of my life put together. I became up-close and personal with my tool shed and all the host of tools therein.

As we were talking during our devotion, I was thinking of these tools and my life. For most of my adult years I had been extremely active in the church and had been a part of nearly every type of ministry there was. My boys grew up being my helpers, sleeping under pews and hearing bible studies over and over that they had already heard me teach. I recognized needs in the churches I had been a part of and tried to fulfill what I could, just like I had seen the need to clean up my yard and get rid of the debris that took away from the beauty that I knew existed under it. There was nothing wrong with using my energy to meet needs, except that I was trying to be all tools to all needs, which made me become more like a worn out Swiss Army knife than a specialized tool. Often I’d find myself chipped, worn-down, and sometimes broken and hence… not as useable as I should have been.

God did not call any of us to be all things to all people. I believe that it is more pleasing to Him that we become deep and skilled in our areas of ministry instead of spread thin and shallow where we are less effective. We are tools in His hands and just like a shovel from my shed cannot do the work of a hammer effectively, we cannot do all the works that God has need of in His kingdom effectively. We are one body, each being a part – a tool – that works together for one purpose. When we try to be something God did not design us to be we end up being frustrated and weary, seeing little progress which can lead to bitterness or losing our faith in God.

During a recent part of my life I stopped working in all the ministries that I was involved in because I had become so weary, worn and broken that I could no longer function properly. It was no longer just a matter of being re-sharpened; I had to be remade. After a long period of recovery and being remade, I became involved in a ministry again, but only one – Kids Prayer training. I made myself a promise that I would become deep and skilled in one thing instead of all the things I seen that needed help around me. That meant that I had to trust God that He would take care of the other needs and raise up others to help in those areas, if they truly were His will and His needs to begin with.

I am no longer a Swiss Army knife; I am one tool doing one thing well that will bring more glory to God than fumbling attempts of being a whole shed of tools that do not work effectively. I am now at peace. I am now able to focus. I am now able to hear God where before all I could hear was the groaning of my own voice under the weight of all the work I was trying to carry. I am now able to bring God glory instead of only desperate prayers for strength to just make it another day.

Lord, you created us with a plan and purpose for our lives. Often we allow our plans and desires to become more important than Yours, and we make decisions in our life without consulting You and in the end we end up broken and burnt out. Help me to follow your plan for my life. Help me to not compare myself and my ministry to others. Help me to be content with doing what You want me to do, no matter how big or how little or how others see its significance. I submit my will to Yours. Help me to do well what You’ve created me to do so I can bring You glory. If I am ever involved in works that You would like for me to forgo, then place that in my heart and help my desires to be the same desires You have for my life so I will work in Your will, and be effective. I want to be the tool You designed me to be.

 

Colleen Clabaugh

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Making Room for Kids http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/articles/making-room-for-kids/ Wed, 09 Mar 2011 16:31:24 +0000 http://new.kidsprayer.com/?p=3277 Related posts:
  1. Why Have a Kids Prayer Ministry?
  2. Leading By Example
  3. Why Teach Children to Pray
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(published in the Christian Educator  magazine)

Jesus said, “My house will be called an house of prayer…” Making room for kids in His house of prayer is not only possible, but there is a simple plan your church can follow.

Step One: Make room by changing the way you pray. There is a dynamic that comes when children pray in earnest with simple faith…and simple words. Kids’ prayers will not be long, but direct and to the point unless they are intercessors. Kids say they are intimidated at times by long, boring prayers and the sounds of “cattle lowing in the prayer barn.” They don’t need all the verbiage nor the noise to touch Jesus. So to make room, begin praying out loud in simple sentences to address specific needs. Learn to become comfortable praying one at a time in corporate settings. Kids will have an easier time participating and fitting in if they don’t have to compete with adults who “know how to touch God.” As you make these changes, kids will notice and respond with a little training and encouragement.

Step Two: Make room by making time for them. For those wanting to start a prayer class, there is a relatively new curriculum available from www.shekinahkids.com or the General Sunday School Division that will assist in teaching kids from grades 3-5 prayer leadership skills and Scripture prayer techniques. The cost for everything needed is only $60. Regardless of the curriculum, the class will require a few key ingredients.

  • Commitment of the mentor to be faithful to the class, even when he is tired, uninspired, and unnoticed.  It is not necessary to be a “prayer warrior” to teach kids to pray. It is going to be important however, that the mentor is also an advocate for the children’s prayer class.
  • Curriculum that works. Ask anyone who has been brave enough to begin teaching kids to pray his number one frustration and it will be finding a good curriculum. What to look for? Something that is low maintenance, high motivation, lively, and FUN! The best we’ve found so far is “The Shekinah Kids Revolution.” Pepper whatever curriculum you use with prayer projects for needs in missions, neighborhoods, and prayer walks, etc.
  • Kids who want to learn to pray. No matter the age grouping or curriculum, only kids who want to learn to pray should be involved. It is a good idea to do a promotion for the class and have students sign up once a year.
  • A sense of adventure and wonder. This is an uncharted area in many of our churches, isn’t it? There is adventure in discovering a curriculum that actually works (or making up a new one). There is a challenge in “reprogramming” adults to think differently about kids prayer (including the mentor). And oh, the satisfaction of seeing results and the excitement of it all when God starts answering their eight-word wonders.

Step Three: Make room by giving kids opportunities to pray. All the teaching in the world and all the training they can handle won’t mean much until they begin to use it. Where could they use what they learn? At home, school, church, class…even the car. One first grader, after only 3 days of training, made up a game of praying for people who passed her van on the road if their car was a certain color. Here are a few good questions to get you started.

  • How can children’s prayer be integrated into every ministry of my church? Praying for offerings, nursery kids and their parents, Sunday school classes, children’s church meetings, altar services and special events.
  • Where can children pray in a group? Playgrounds, shopping malls, police and fire stations, hospitals (outside) and a friend’s house.

In the area of “giving opportunities,” please be aware of something important. According to recent studies, the generation known as “Millenials” (those born after 1982) have a propensity toward involvement and action. After 9-11 this was obvious to many who noticed it was the young kids and teenagers who organized prayer vigils and collected items for victims in their neighborhoods. This same thirst for involvement will go unquenched in the Body unless we begin making room now for kids who can lead in prayer.

Make room…make way. It’s His house and He wants it this way.

 

UPDATE: For those starting or wishing to provide training on kids prayer, please check out our 7 Esssentials of Kid’s Prayer. It’s a great resource with concepts, implementation help, and creative ideas.

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Why Have a Kids Prayer Ministry? http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/articles/why-have-a-kids-prayer-ministry/ Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:49:22 +0000 http://new.kidsprayer.com/?p=3173 Related posts:
  1. Altar working with kids
  2. Tips for an Effective Altar Service
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We want our kids to pray, but do they really need a “kids prayer ministry?”

6 Reasons for a Kids Prayer Ministry…

Scripture declares the importance of children’s involvement in the Kingdom of God. From silencing the enemies of God (Psalm 8:2) to signs and wonders (Isaiah 8:18, Joel 2:28) to leading in worship (II Chronicles 29:10-11) children have a place in the Body of Christ. Too many times they are relegated to back rooms and basements and if they have their own worship area, they end up segregated from the rest of the body 75% of time. It is important that children receive age-appropriate training, but the ultimate goal of that training is integration into the Body of Christ…not solely preparation for future service.

The Same Holy Spirit resides in them. When children are filled with the Holy Spirit, they do not receive the Holy Spirit, Jr. The same Holy Spirit that fills adults, fills children. The problem is, too many times we base our understanding of spiritual growth dynamics on the physical world. In the case of children, their ability to mature spiritually is in a kind of hyper drive that we can’t comprehend when we are boxed in by our experiences in the physical world. Two and three year olds can hear the voice of God and obey; four year olds can intercede with understanding; elementary aged children can actually begin leading in worship and prayer.

The “Body” needs their prayer power. Imagine the Kingdom of Light advancing with double strength overnight. If I could, I would flip a switch to activate all children currently receiving spiritual training to answer the call of the Spirit; our ranks would double or triple in a moment. Your local church needs their prayer power and expansive faith and so does the global Body of Christ. Think about it. What would happen if every kid in your church began to pray in earnest and in the Spirit? What would happen if suddenly their boundless faith was released to benefit the Kingdom?

This generation demands to be included. According to studies and research, the Millennials generation (Millenials Rising) is a generation that is demanding inclusion. “…born after 1982…as a group, Millennials are unlike any other youth generation in living memory. They are more numerous, more affluent, better educated, and more ethnically diverse. More important, they are beginning to manifest a wide array of positive social habits that older Americans no longer associate with youth, including a new focus on teamwork, achievement, modesty, and good conduct.” They are the ones who organized the neighborhood prayer vigils after 9/11; they are the ones who raised untold thousands in schools for tsunami victims in early 2005. Their actions put them in a position to be greatly used by society but most importantly, by God.

Kids require training, not just teaching. Teaching is what we do for adults, training is what we need to be doing for children. When children come into this natural world, there are all sorts of training “modules” to help them navigate this existence. From potty training to making beds; from tying shoes to brushing teeth, training is required…and repeated over and over again. Now, contrast that with the kind of spiritual training kids are given. Who trains them in doing spiritual things? Sunday school teachers, parents, relatives, pastor?

Consider the “dark side.” For this last section, ask yourself, “How old does a child have to be to handle spiritual weapons?” Next consider that there are currently over 200,000 child soldiers worldwide engaged in a conflict right now. Young children are being taught to use grenades, machine guns, rifles, vest-bombs, and more. Those working on the dark side know the value of children. Why is it teenagers can participate in suicide bombings? They are trained at a young age to handle explosives and are told what to expect in the next life if they become martyrs. Have you taught a Bible story lately that compares to that? Has anyone put a spiritual weapon in the hands of a child recently that has the power spiritually equivalent to a dirty bomb? If not, then don’t you think it’s time for a kids prayer ministry in your church? The kids are ready. God is ready. Are you?

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Use Me Too! http://www.kidsprayer.com/adults/articles/use-me-too/ Mon, 07 Mar 2011 16:43:51 +0000 http://new.kidsprayer.com/?p=3168 ]]> If you can use anything Lord you can use me. Right? How often do our children hear this song or phrase used in church and think, “Well God can use me but not until I am 16.” Why do most children think this way? Is it because that is what they were told or because that is just the way things seem to work. “I know I can help lead in children’s church, once I am in sixth grade.” Sometimes I wonder if we as children’s ministers encourage this type of thinking. I know that I have found myself falling into this trap. “I will have Susie lead prayer tonight because she is the oldest and has the most experience.” What I have noticed happening is that my younger children are the ones leading in prayer and bringing the older children to a deeper level.

God does not look for age or experience. He simply looks for availability and a heart that is hungry to hear from Him. God chose a lowly shepherd boy to become Israel’s king. He was anointed as a boy to take this position and yet his own father did not even consider him to be in the running. David was called a man after God’s own heart. The prophet that anointed David grew up in the presence of the Lord. (I Samuel 2:21 NLT) When Samuel was born his mother gave him to the Lord to be used in the priesthood. When God first spoke to him, he went to his leader Eli because he did not know God’s voice. It was Eli that told Samuel that God was trying to speak to him. The next time God called Samuel’s name he answered by saying “…your servant is listening.” (I Samuel 3:9 NLT) He was told the plans that God had to bring the Israelites back into right-standing. Josiah became king at the age of eight. In I Kings 13:2 it was prophesied that Josiah would tear down all the altars that were being used to worship idols. During his reign as king, Josiah did just as the prophecy said. He was a king like no other in the history of Israel. (II Kings 23:25 NLT) These are all examples of God using a child to bring His people back to him. In the New Testament it was the children who cried Hosanna in Jerusalem and realized who Jesus really was.

I believe that it is our responsibility to let the children in our care know that they can be used by God. We need to train, equip, and provide opportunity for children to minister. In a recent children’s prayer conference a group of children were lead into intercession by a missionary kid from Africa. When that missionary kid began to intercede during a video about Africa other children came forth to minister to him. What began with three kids praying (one for a country, two for the missionary kid) ended up with 20-30 children all praying in agreement for that continent.

Recently on a Sunday night a group of seven girls prayed for the youth in the altar service. These girls felt comfortable doing this because they had been trained to pray with others, and they were told that it was ok to pray with the older kids. In a Shekinah Kids meeting this past week 15 kids entered into intercession for the AIDS orphans in Africa. In this case it was the younger group of children that lead the older group into a deeper level of prayer. They were equipped with the facts, statistics, and pictures. They had been trained in the purpose of intercession. They were given opportunity by being able to pray how they wanted in an atmosphere where they felt safe.

It is our responsibility to provide that atmosphere. If we lead them to that place and let God take care of the rest, great things can happen. Children will be the leaders in the greatest revival we have ever seen or heard of, but we must be the ones that help clear the way for them to begin to minister. Remember these are not just kids but they are God’s kids!

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